Vocal Cool Down Exercises Wednesday July 28 2021, 11:45 PM
Yona Marie
Singer, Songwriter, Producer.
Vocal Cool Down Exercises

Cooling Down Your Voice 


We all know about the benefits of doing a good vocal warmup to prep your voice for singing, but how much do you know about doing vocal cooldowns? I hadn't even heard of this idea until a couple of years ago. I'm very familiar with warming up and cooling down for cardio, but I never thought about the need to cool down with vocal exercises. 

Cooldowns for your vocals help to reset your body and voice back to neutral. You don't want to be stuck in vocal performance mode once the performance time has passed. Relaxing and stretching your voice box can help release unnecessary tension in your body and allow you to avoid stress on your speaking voice. It also helps you avoid vocal fatigue and rasp after an intense performance (or several). 

I recently noticed that if I have sung a gig that lasts a while, especially if I performed aggressively, my throat feels tight and swollen that night or the following day. By doing light vocalizations for a few minutes on the drive home greatly reduces that feeling of soreness. The keyword here is light! 

Related Post: Why Does My Throat Hurt After Singing?

A vocal cooldown does not need to take long at all. You will need 15 minutes at most to get back to a good vocal state, but 5-10 minutes will do really well. It's a small thing to add to your schedule, so there are no excuses on why you shouldn't start cooling down if you're a serious singer! 

Your Body In Performance Mode 


When you warm your voice up and perform, a lot is going on behind the scenes that you probably aren't aware of as a singer. These include the following:

1. Your core is working way harder than normal while singing.

2. You have increased blood flow to your vocal cords when singing. 

3. You have heightened airflow and air pressure while singing for your breathing.

4. Your heart rate and blood pressure is raised while singing. 

5. You have wider vertical movement of the larynx when you are in performance mode. 

6.  Your vocal fold stretches much further when you are singing. 

Vocal Exercises to Cool Down 


To get back to a normal state that won't overwork you once you're done singing, try the following:


Lip Trills: Lip trills (also known as lip rolls) work really well for warmups and cooldowns for your voice box. These are usually done by sliding up and down the scale while vibrating your lips on the b vowel. This puts your voice in a malleable state that can help transition you to regular speaking levels more comfortably. 





Upper Body Stretches: Neck rolls, arm stretches, and core stretches will help you get back to your normal state comfortably as well. Move slowly through these cooldown stretches to make sure the whole process is relaxing and not raising your heart rate. 



Siren Wail: Slide down your range from the highest comfortable note very slowly and in a relaxed position. Your volume level shouldn't be particularly loud since you are trying to destress your vocal cords, but make sure you aren't going through this process too softly, especially in your higher range.



Small Slide: Similar to a downward siren wail, you can also slide down from 5 to 1 on a scale instead of sliding down a full octave or more. For example, you start at G and slowly sing down to a C. This can be done following a major scale or with a chromatic scale. 


Yona Marie

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